CAPSICUM, BRINJAL AND POTATO CURRY

Capsicum, Brinjal and Potato Curry

CAPSICUM, BRINJAL AND POTATO CURRY

Serves 6

Time Required: 45 minutes

Ingredients

1/2 kg small Brinjals cut into halves,

3 potatoes peeled and chopped into quarters,

2 capsicums cut into quarters,

3 tablespoons coconut paste,
3 onions chopped,

2 tablespoons coriander leaves,

4 cloves,

6 or 8 whole pepper corns,

1 teaspoon cumin seeds,

½ teaspoon turmeric powder,

2 tablespoons chillie powder,

3 tablespoons tamarind juice,

3 tablespoons oil,

Salt to taste
Heat oil in a pan and fry the cloves, pepper corns and cumin seeds for a minute. Add the onions and sauté till golden brown. Add the brinjals, capsicums and potatoes and all the other ingredients and mix well. Add 2 cups of water and cook covered till the potatoes and brinjals are cooked. Simmer till the gravy thickens. Serve with rice or chapattis or rotis.

ANGLO-INDIAN STYLE MUTTON DO-PIAZA also known as Double Onions Mutton Curry or Twice the Onions Curry

ANGLO-INDIAN STYLE MUTTON DO-PIAZA also known as Double Onions Mutton Curry or Twice the Onions Curry

Dopiaza Mutton or Chicken Dishes were very popular in Anglo-Indian homes in Calcutta and across Bengal. Do Piaza when translated literally means “two onions,”. This means that the Do Piaza Curry is prepared with almost double the quantity of onions as compared to a normal Meat or chicken curry. In a Dopiaza Curry, half the quantity of the onions are added raw while cooking the curry and the remaining onions are fried and added to the dish at the end.  The prominent flavour of onions gives a slight sweet taste to the curry.

 

Serves 6           Time required: 1 hour

Ingredients

½ kg Mutton

4 large onions sliced

1 large tomato chopped

2 bay leaves

2 teaspoon chillie powder

1 teaspoon ginger garlic paste

1 teaspoons coriander powder

1 teaspoon all spice powder or garam masala powder

2 tablespoons lime juice

Salt to taste

3 tablespoons oil

2 green chillies sliced

2 cloves

2 cardamoms

2 one pieces of cinnamon

2 tablespoon curds / yoghurt

 

Marinate the mutton with chillie powder, ginger garlic paste, coriander powder, spice powder / garam  masala powder and salt and keep aside for 1 hour.

Heat the oil in a suitable pan or pressure cooker and sauté half of the onions till golden brown. Remove and keep aside.

In the same pan add the marinated meat along with the bay leaves, green chillies, cloves, cinnamon and cardamom.  Fry on low heat for about 5 minutes. Add the remaining sliced onions, chopped tomato, curds and mix well. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Now add 2 glasses of water and mix well. Cook covered on low heat for 1 hour (or pressure cook for 15 minutes) till the mutton is tender and the gravy is quite thick. Now add the fried onions and mix once. Remove from heat.

Garnish with Chopped Coriander leaves if dersired. Serve with Rice or chapattis.

 

Note: Beef or Chicken can also be used instead.

A SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIA LUNCH – White Steamed Rice, Simple Fried Fish, Raddish and Dol Curry (Red Lentils), Plain Pepper Water, Beans Foogath and Tomato Sambal

A SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIA LUNCH – White Steamed Rice, Simple Fried Fish, Raddish and Dol Curry (Red Lentils), Plain Pepper Water, Beans Foogath and Tomato Sambal

PLAIN WHITE STEAMED RICE

Serves 6       Time required: 45 minutes

Ingredients

1 cup raw rice

2 cups water

A pinch of salt

Wash the rice and soak in 2 cups of water and a pinch of salt for 15 minutes. Place on heat and bring to boil. Reduce heat and cook on low heat till done and all the water is absorbed. Cover and allow to stand  for 15 minutes before serving. This is the standard plain steamed rice eaten every day. Serve with any curry, dhal or pepper water.

SIMPLE FRIED FISH

Serves 6     Time required: 45 minutes

Ingredients

8 or 10 slices of any good fleshy fish

2 teaspoons chillie powder

1 teaspoon turmeric powder

Salt to taste

Oil for frying

Wash the fish and marinate with the chillie powder, salt, and turmeric powder for about 15 minutes.

Heat the oil in a flat pan and shallow fry the pieces about 4 at a time till nice and brown on both sides.  Serve with bread and chips.

This is also a good accompaniment to pepper water and rice.  It could also be served as a snack. (For a more crispy fish, coat the fish slices with a little semolina or rice flour)

RADISH AND DOL (RED LENTILS / DHAL) CURRY 

Serves 6      Time Required:1 hour

Ingredients

1 cup Red Lentils or Masoor Dhal

4 long white radish peeled and cut into 2 inch piece

2 teaspoons chillie powder

1 teaspoon coriander powder

½ teaspoon turmeric powder

1 teaspoon cumin powder

2 tomatoes chopped

1 teaspoon crushed garlic (optional)

Salt to taste

For the seasoning: 1 teaspoon mustard, 2 red chilies broken into bits and a few curry leaves and 1 tablespoon oil.

Wash the Red Lentils / masoor dhal and cook it along with the tomato, chillie powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, turmeric powder, garlic and radish with sufficient water in a pressure cooker.  When done open the cooker, add salt and some more water and mix well.

To Temper the Dal Curry:

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in another suitable pan and add the mustard, broken red chilies and crushed garlic and fry for some time. When the mustard starts spluttering, pour in the cooked dhal and mix   well. Serve with rice

PLAIN PEPPER WATER

A simple and easy recipe to prepare the classic Anglo-Indian  Pepper Water. Pepper Water is an important dish on the Anglo-Indian lunch table and is invariably prepared many times a week. Pepper water can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days without spoiling due to the tamarind used in its preparation.

Serves 6     Time required: 30 minutes

Ingredients

2 large tomatoes chopped

1 teaspoon ground black pepper / pepper powder

1 teaspoon chillie powder

1 teaspoon cumin powder

½ teaspoon turmeric powder

½ teaspoon coriander powder

Salt to taste

½ cup tamarind juice extracted from a small ball of tamarind

or 1 teaspoon tamarind paste

Cook all the above ingredients with 3 or 4 cups of water in a suitable vessel on high heat till it boils. Reduce the heat and cook on low heat for about 10 minutes. Temper the Pepper Water, as follows

To temper the Pepper Water: Heat 2 teaspoons oil in another vessel, add a teaspoon of mustard seeds. When they begin to splutter add a sliced onion, a few curry leaves, two broken red chilies and a teaspoon of chopped crushed garlic and sauté for a few minutes, till the onions turn light brown. Pour the pepper water into the seasoning and mix well. Turn off the heat.  Serve hot with rice and any meat side dish.

Note: The pepper water can be prepared by using fresh red chilies cumin seeds coriander seeds, peppercorns ground in a mixer instead of the powders.

BEANS FOOGATH (STIR FRY BEANS)

Serves 6     Time required: 30 minutes

Ingredients

½ kg string beans chopped finely

3 tender carrots chopped into small pieces

½ cup grated coconut

3 red chilies broken into bits

¼ teaspoon mustard seeds

A few curry leaves

Boil the chopped beans and carrots for about 5 minutes with some water.  Strain and keep aside.  Heat oil in a pan and add the mustard seeds. When they splutter add the red chilies and curry leaves and fry for a few seconds. Now toss in the boiled beans.  Add salt and coconut and mix well. Stir-fry for a few minutes and then take down.

TOMATO SAMBAL

Ingredients

2 big tomatoes chopped

3 green chilies chopped

½ teaspoon cumin powder

1 tablespoon chopped garlic

1 medium size onion chopped

Salt to taste

A pinch of sugar

Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions and garlic for a few minutes. Add the chopped tomatoes, cumin powder, salt, sugar and green chilies and fry till the tomatoes are reduced to a pulp. Grind in a blender. Season with mustard seeds, red chilies and curry leaves.

 

ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE EVENT AT COCHRANE PLACE KURSEONG

I’ve just got back from the most amazing Food Event at the launch of the Gourmet Week at Cochrane Place Kurseong in the Darjeeling Hills. Conceived and curated by Dr Ashish Chopra who is India’s top Culinary Historian, Author, Gourmand, T V Host, Flavour Analyst and Travel Writer. The launch of the Cochrane Place Gourmet Club, was a Week long festival celebrating the love of food. (Feb 14th to 19th). Thank you Ashish for making this happen. You are Santa Claus
Cochrane Place Kurseong is the restored stately British Colonial home of late Percy Cochrane the District Magistrate of Kurseong. Perched on a ridge surrounded by lush tea gardens the building is set in stone, log and cast iron splendour offering panoramic views of the Himalayas, it was the perfect setting for a week of scrumptious Food.
I’m just repeating the words of Dr Ashish Chopra “Its all happening at COCHRANE PLACE,KURSEONG in the midst of Tea country this month .. Bridget White Kumar weaves her magic with Anglo Indian cuisine, Sohini Basu, Cordon Bleu Pastry chef does magic with her cup cakes, Susmit Bose, the legendary Urban folk musician enthralls us with his golden voice, Ramaa Shanker cooks up some soul food of tasty Vegetarian Dishes, Kaveri Ponnapa Kambiranda, the celebrity author, Anthropologist and Gourmand teaches us how to make a Coorg special and one of my favourites Pandi curry, Avijit Dutt, the grand theatre man and actor shares his travel and culinary experience, Yours truly Ashish Chopra musters up dishes from my forthcoming book Tribal cuisines of India and introduces the black bird kadaknath. GROVER ZAMPA joins in the fun and gets us to taste their wines and pair them with respective cuisines”
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“On day One, our lunch began beautifully with a group of British Heritage Railway enthusiasts dawning upon Cochrane Place to savour a specially created Anglo Indian Railway menu served during the days of the Raj… With Bridget White Kumar cooking and Dhiraj Arora in assistance taking over the kitchen and mustering up a splendid meal consisting of Railway Chicken Curry, Egg Vindaloo, Railway Vegetable Cutlets, Vegetable Jal Frezi,Country Captain Beans, Mulligatawny Soup with a twist and the most awesome Pineapple upside down cake baked by Sohini Basu along with a Beetroot Carrot Halwa”

collage dishes 1
cochrane place bridget 1
In like manner t he Menus were specially crafted each day to revisit the days of Colonial Raj Cuisine. A 2nd World War Army Camp Menu was specially created to honour 2 Army Generals of the Area who were the special guests at dinner such as the Army Camp Soup, Col Standhursts Lamb Curry, Bengal Lancers Mince Cutlets, etc. Other Colonial Anglo-Indian Dishes such as Pork Vindaloo. Dak Bungalow Mutton Curry, Grandma’s Country Captain, Inspection Bungalow Vegetable Stew, Chillie Pork Fry, Stuffed Aubergines, Brown Sahib Soup, Okra and Potato Pepper fry, Vegetable Jal Frazie Shepherd’s Pie, Vegetarian Cottage Pie, A variety of baked dishes, etc, etc, were on the menu and thoroughly enjoyed by the guests. The Chicken and Lamb Roasts were marinated in a Grover Red Wine Marinade and the Stews and soups were given a liberal dash of Grover White Wines. To round off all the Hot Food, we stuffed ourselves with decadent Desserts prepared by Sohini Basu and her two talented assistants from Mrs, Magpies Kolkotta Apart from the Gourmet Dinners, the Chefs and Kitchen staff of Cochrane Place dished up some delicious local dishes, Bengali Food and Chinese Dishes. They excelled in feeding us sumptuous Breakfasts, Snacks and Short Eats besides the endless cups of hot tea in different flavours to offset the cold weather. We were well and truly stuffed !!!!!collage dishes 3

Boiled Eggs and Capsicum Curry

Egg and Capsicum Curry.jpg 1

BOILED EGGS AND CAPSICUM CURRY
Serves 6 Preparation and Cooking Time 1 hour
Ingredients

6 hard-boiled Eggs shelled and cut into halves
3 onions chopped finely
2 tomatoes chopped
1 capsicum / green pepper deseeded and chopped
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
1 teaspoon chillie powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon all spice powder or garam masala powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons oil
1 sprig curry leaves (optional)

Heat oil in a pan and sauté the curry leaves, onions and chopped garlic till the onions turn golden brown. Add the tomatoes and capsicum and fry till the tomatoes are reduced to pulp. Add the chillie powder, turmeric powder, cumin powder and spice powder and mix well. Add salt and ½ cup of water and bring to boil. Lower heat and gently drop in the hard boiled eggs with the yolk side up. Simmer for a few minutes till the gravy becomes thick. Serve with Rice, bread or chapattis.

DEVILLED BEEF MINCE BALLS

Devilled Meat Balls 1
DEVILLED BEEF MINCE BALLS
Serves 6 Preparation Time approx 1 hour
Ingredients
1 kg Beef Mince
3 onions chopped finely
3 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves or chopped parsley
2 teaspoons chillie powder
1 teaspoon pepper powder
4 tablespoons breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons tomato sauce
A few curry leaves
2 tablespoons flour
Salt to taste
4 tablespoons oil

Mix the mince with the chopped onions, coriander leaves / parsley, chillie powder, pepper powder, salt and bread crumbs and set aside for one hour. Squeeze out all the water. Divide into equal size portions then roll into balls. Heat oil in a nonstick pan and fry the meat balls gently till they are brown. Remove and keep aside.

In the same oil add a few curry leaves, 2 tablespoons of flour, 1 teaspoon pepper powder, a pinch of salt and 2 tablespoons tomato sauce and mix well. Add 1 cup of water and bring to boil. Add the fried meat balls and shake the pan gently so that the gravy covers all of them. Simmer on low heat for about 20 minutes till the meat balls are firm and the gravy dries up. Keep frying gently till the balls are fried to a golden brown. Serve as a Starter or a side dish with Pepper Water and White Steamed rice.

ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES – REVISED EDITION

ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES – REVISED EDITION
The word “Everlasting” means ‘something, that once created, endures through time and never ceases to exist’. Anglo-Indian Cuisine is “EVERLASTING” and will endure forever and ever.
ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES – REVISED VERSION
It gives me great pleasure to bring out this revised version of ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES. In this book I’ve endeavoured to cover some of the old typical dishes that were popular in Calcutta, and other parts of Bengal besides Central and Eastern India. Dishes such as Pork Bhooni, Chicken / Meat Jal Frezie, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets (Kobhiraji Cutlet), Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry (Do Piaza), Meat Glassey (Glazzie ) or Fruity meat Curry, Meat and Spinach Curry, Duck Dumpoke, etc, are some of the old favourites featured here.

I’ve also included some recipes for dishes that were popular during World War II and were served in the Army camps and Officer’s Mess, such as the Army Camp Soup, Brown Windsor Soup, The Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Veal Country Captain (Cold Meat Curry), Bubble and Squeak, One Eyed Jack, Colonel Sandhurst’s Beef Curry, etc., besides a host of other assorted dishes and preparations such as Pilafs, pickles and chutneys, Savouries, sweets and Festive Treats and Home Made wines.
It is a Complete Compendium of popular Anglo-Indian Dishes.

COOKING CLASSES IN BANGALORE BY BRIDGET WHITE-KUMAR

SIMPLE INDIAN DISHES AND ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE

Bridget White Anglo-Indian Recipes

Bridget White Anglo-Indian Recipes

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