ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES – VINTAGE AND CONTEMPORARY CUISINE FROM COLONIAL ANGLO INDIA

‘ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES’ is an interesting assortment of easy- to- follow Recipes of popular vintage and contemporary Cuisine of Colonial Anglo India. It covers a wide spectrum, of recipes ranging from mouth watering Gravies and Curries, Pepper Water and Fries, Roasts and Steaks to tasty Pulaos and Pickles, Savouries, Sweets and Christmas treats,. A few home brewed wines are also included to round off the extensive flavours and tastes.
In this book I’ve endeavoured to cover some of the old typical dishes that were popular in Calcutta, and other parts of Bengal besides Central and Eastern India. Dishes such as Pork Bhooni, Chicken / Meat Jal Frezie, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets (Kobhiraji Cutlet), Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry (Do Piaza), Meat Glassey (Glazzie ) or Fruity meat Curry, Meat and Spinach Curry, Duck Dumpoke, etc, are some of the old favourites featured here. I’ve also included some recipes for dishes that were popular during World War II and were served in the Army camps and Officer’s Mess, such as the Army Camp Soup, Brown Windsor Soup, The Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Veal Country Captain (Cold Meat Curry), Bubble and Squeak, One Eyed Jack, Colonel Sandhurst’s Beef Curry, Salted Tongue, Salted Beef, Corned Beef, Kalkals, Rose Cookies, Dhol Dhol, BeefPanthras, Potato Chops etc. All these dishes have been given a new lease of life, besides a host of other assorted dishes and preparations.

The new revised version of ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES has lots of new recipes in this edition. The groupings this time are: Soups and Pepper Water, Curries, Gravies, Fries, Side Dishes and More (which include Chicken and Poultry; Meat – beef, lamb and mutton; Pork, Fish, Prawns, Crabs and Eggs) Vegetarian Variety, Rice dishes, Anglo-Indian pickles and chutneys, Savaouries, Sweets and Festive Treats, Homemade Wines and some Basic Curry Powders.
The recipes in this book are simple and easy to follow and only easily available ingredients have been suggested. The easy-to-follow directions for preparing these old, popular, sumptuous dishes make cooking simple, enjoyable and problem-free. The pungency of the dishes can be reduced according to individual taste by reducing the amount of chillie powder, spices or pepper powder suggested in each recipe. All the recipes in this Book are for 6 generous servings. If cooking for a smaller or larger number, the quantities should be adjusted accordingly.

INTRODUCTION

It gives me great pleasure to bring out this revised version of ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES. The immense support and encouragement that I received from people all over the world has encouraged me to bring out these Recipe Books of typical authentic Anglo-Indian Dishes.

Anglo-Indian Cuisine purportedly, first came into existence in Calcutta and parts of Bengal. It was here, that the Khansamas and Cooks in the olden days, innovated and experimented to give us one of the world’s first “Fusion Cuisines”. There was a great deal of innovation in the preparation of soups, entrees, side dishes, sauces and salads that were conjured up by the Indian Khansamas and Cooks in those early times.

European Colonial India modified certain Indian dishes by decreasing their pungency and spiciness and gave them English names that sounded like their vernacular original names. Similarly, some traditional British dishes became popular Anglo-Indian fare with the addition of a few Indian spices and condiments, giving them a distinctive flavour.

In this book I’ve endeavoured to cover some of the old typical dishes that were popular in Calcutta, and other parts of Bengal besides Central and Eastern India. Dishes such as Pork Bhooni, Chicken / Meat Jal Frezie, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets (Kobhiraji Cutlet), Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry (Do Piaza), Meat Glassey (Glazzie ) or Fruity meat Curry, Meat and Spinach Curry, Duck Dumpoke, etc, are some of the old favourites featured here.

I’ve also included some recipes for dishes that were popular during World War II and were served in the Army camps and Officer’s Mess, such as the Army Camp Soup, Brown Windsor Soup, The Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Veal Country Captain (Cold Meat Curry), Bubble and Squeak, One Eyed Jack, Colonel Sandhurst’s Beef Curry, etc., besides a host of other assorted dishes and preparations.

A little information on some of the Dishes featured in this book:

Jalfrezie is a sautéd dish, which can be prepared with meat, poultry, sea food etc.
The word “Jalfrezie” came from 2 words: “Jal” meaning “spicy or pungent” and “Frezie” meaning “Fried”. As in the case of almost all of our cuisine, which started out as insipid concoctions, in the days of the British Raj, the original “Jal Frezie” was bland and tasteless. The Colonial servants would fry up the leftover Christmas Turkey and Chicken Roasts with some pepper, chillies, etc., for Breakfast the next day. Over the years many more ingredients and spices were added to this dish to make it as spicy and delicious as it is today and it has become synonymous with the Cuisine of West Bengal.

Meat Glassy / Glazie (Fruity Meat Curry) also known as Sweet Mango Meat Curry, is an old Colonial Dish. It was probably one of the first experiments of the Khansamas / cooks during Colonial days. The addition of mango chutney / pineapple chunks / honey / fruit reduced the spiciness of the curry. Major Grey’s Sweet Mango Chutney or Bolts Mango Chutney was invariably used in this dish. But why the name ‘Glassy’? The word ‘Glassy” is English but its application to this curried dish is mysterious. Somewhere along the line the preparation was named but the origin of its name has been lost. It could be that the onions had to be fried till they turned ‘glassy’ or ‘glazed’. Another version is that the pieces of papaya that was used to tenderize the meat gave the curry a fruity taste and hence ‘Fruity Meat curry’

Fish Kedegeree is an Anglicised version of the Indian Kitchri or Kitchidi, which was prepared with rice, lentils, raisins, etc along with the addition of Fried Fish Flakes and hard boiled eggs. Fish, (either steamed or fried) was a regular item for breakfast during the Raj and the cooks tried to incorporate it with local dishes. Eventually the Fish Kedegeree became a hot cooked spicy dish, with the addition of various spices and was invariably included in the breakfast menu all over the Commonwealth. Minced meat was later added as a variation instead of fish.

The Steamroller Chicken is a Colonial Dish, which got its name only because the pieces of chicken used in its preparation were cut lengthwise and then flattened with a cleaver or Rolling Pin. The Chicken eventually looked as if it was flattened with by a heavy object such as a “Steam Roller or Road Roller”. This is a very subtly flavoured dish with only a hint of seasoning.

Devil Curry as its name suggests, is a rich and fiery hot dish, prepared with lots of chilies. The Devil Curry can be prepared with Beef, Mutton, Chicken, Pork or Eggs. In earlier days, Wild Boar, Venison and Rabbit were also made into the Devil Curry

Dopiaza Chicken or Mutton Dishes are very popular in Anglo-Indian homes across Bengal. Do Piaza when translated literally means “two onions,”. This means that the Do Piaza Curry is prepared with almost double the quantity of onions as compared to a normal Meat or chicken curry. In a Dopiaza Curry, half the quantity of the onions are fried and the remaining onions are later added raw to the curry. Doopiazas are piquant curries taking their origins from the Nawabi kitchens. They are cooked with more oil or ghee and less water with the prominent flavour of onions.

Lamprey Meat or Chicken Curry originated during the time of the British Raj and was prepared with either meat or chicken and served with rice and vegetables or bread to the British Officers in the various Army Camps

Hotch Potch was introduced to Anglo-Indian Cuisine by the Scottish Soldiers Hotch Potch is like a watery stew prepared with meat and different coloured vegetables. It is also known as Harvest Broth in Scotland as it was prepared with fresh vegetables and freshly slaughtered meat at summer’s end all packed into a light broth for a wonderfully fresh stew with all the colors of summer vegetables.

DUMPOKE is the Anglicized name for “Dum Pukht” which literally means to cook over low heat in a tightly sealed utensil. Dum’ means to ‘breathe in’ and ‘Pukht’ to ‘cook’. Dum Pukht cooking uses a round, heavy -bottomed pot, in which food is tightly sealed and cooked over a slow fire. The process of slow roasting gently persuades each spice / ingredient to release maximum flavor. By cooking slowly in its juices, the food retains all its natural aromas and becomes imbued with the richness of flavors that distinguishes the dish. Dumpoke thus became part of Anglo-Indian Cuisine as the same method of cooking in a tightly sealed utensil was used during the preparation of Roasts, Pilafs / Palau’s etc.

DEVILLED EGGS are also known as Eggs Mimosa, Picnic Eggs or Dressed Eggs. Devilled eggs are hard-boiled eggs that are shelled, cut in half and filled with the hard-boiled egg’s yolk that is mixed with other foodstuffs such as mayonnaise, mustard many other ingredients depending on one’s choice. Deviled eggs are usually served cold. They can be served as a side dish or with a main course. However, Devilled Eggs are popular appetizers or starters at a party or picnic.

BROWN WINDSOR SOUP
Brown Windsor Soup, though originally beef-based, it used to be regularly served at clubs in India. This classic hearty soup was also served daily on the menu (right until India attained Independence in 1947), in the Railway refreshment Rooms and Dining Cars along with the famous RAILWAY MUTTON / LAMB CURRY. A rich and hearty soup, it constitutes a meal in itself when served with crusty bread, scones or bread rolls.

The recipes in this book are simple and easy to follow and only easily available ingredients have been suggested. The easy-to-follow directions for preparing these old, popular, sumptuous dishes make cooking simple, enjoyable and problem-free. The pungency of the dishes can be reduced according to individual taste by reducing the amount of chillie powder, spices or pepper powder suggested in each recipe.

All the recipes in this Book are for 6 generous servings. If cooking for a smaller or larger number, the quantities should be adjusted accordingly.

The word “Everlasting” means ‘something, that once created, endures through time and never ceases to exist’. Anglo-Indian Cuisine is “EVERLASTING” and will endure forever and ever.

CONTENTS
Introduction
Some Helpful Hints

I SOUPS, MULLIGATAWNY AND PEPPER WATER

1. Chicken Mulligatawny Soup
2. Lamb / Mutton Mulligatawny Soup
3. Dhal Soup
4. Trotters Soup
5. Ox Tail Soup
6. Anglo-Indian potato Soup
7. Kenny Boy’s Congee or Chicken and Barley Broth
8. Anglo-Indian Pepper Water
9. Dhal Pepper Water (Lentil Based Pepper Water)
10. Breast Bone Pepper Water

II CURRIES, FRIES, GRAVIES, SIDE DISHES & MORE

1 Simple Meat Vindaloo
2. Anglo-Indian Mince Ball Curry/ Bad Word Curry (Meat kofta Curry)
3. Simple Anglo-Indian Beef Curry
4. Meat Glassy (Fruity Meat / Sweet Mango Meat Curry)
5. Railway Meat Curry
6. Meat Puli Fry / Tangy Meat Fry (Meat cooked in tamarind sauce)
7. Posthole Mince / Dry Mince Fry
8. Meat and Runner Beans Curry
9. Hot Beef Fry
10. Meat and Dhal Curry (Meat and lentils)
11. Mutton / Lamb Fry
12. Madras Mutton / Lamb Quorma
13. Meat in Green Masala Curry
14. Anglo-Indian Masala Chops
15. Meat Pepper Fry
16. Beef Pepper Steaks
17. Rack of Lamb / Mutton Pepper Chops
18. Anglo-Indian Meat Grill
19. Veal Pepper Chops
20. Spicy Veal Curry
21. Stuffed Snake Coy Curry (Snake Gourd / Serpent Gourd)
22. Brown Stew ( Meat and Vegetable Stew)
23. Almorth (Mixed Meat Stew)
24. Ox Tail Vindaloo
25. Curried Trotters
26. 30 Spicy Brain Fry
27. Onions and Liver Fry
28. Stewed Lamb Kidneys
29. Hot and spicy Tripe (Boty Curry)
30. OxTongue Vindaloo
31. Sheep’s Head Curry
32. Crumbed Mutton / Lamb Chops
33. Pepper Mince Potato chops
34. Minced Meat Cutlets
35. Spicy Meat Croquettes (long Cutlets)
36. Beef Croquettes
37. Ding Ding (Savoury sun dried Meat Crispies)
38. Brain Cutlets
39 Brinjal Bake (Egg plant / Aubergine Bake)
40. Spicy Meat Patties
41 Cornish Pasties
42. Beef Pot Roast
43. Ox Tongue Roast
44. Pork Vindaloo
45. Country Captain Pork
46. Madras Pork Curry
47. Spicy Pork Chops
48.Simple Pork Pot Roast
49. Spicy Pork Fry
50. Pork Baffad
51. Chicken Vindaloo
52. Country Captain Chicken
53. Colonial Style Pepper chicken
54. A Simple Anglo-Indian Chicken Curry
55. Fowl Curry in Coconut Gravy
56. Dak Bungalow Chicken Curry
57. Simple Chicken Stew
58. Chicken and Dumpling Stew
59. Country Fowl Baffad
60. Nana’s Bobo Fry (Chicken Fry)
61. Chicken Jalfrazie
62. Chicken Gizzards and Liver Fry
63. Dry Chicken fry
64. Whole Roast Chicken
65. Chicken Croquettes
66. Steam Roller Chicken
67. Duck Vindaloo
68. Duck Moley (Succulent duck cooked with green chillies and coconut milk)
69. Whole Duck Roast
70. Turkey Roast with Stuffing
71. Anglo-Indian Fish Vindaloo
72. Tangy Fish Curry (Fish cooked with Tamarind)
73. Fish Moley ( Fish cooked with green chillies and coconut Milk)
74. Anglo-Indian Fish Curry
75. Fish and Green Mango Curry
76. Salt Fish Curry
77. Fried Fish
78. Stuffed Fried Mackerels
79. Fish Cutlets
80. Fish Croquettes
81. Fried Fish Roe
82. Steamed Fish and Potatoes
83. Shark Mince Fry (Shark Puttu)
84. Simple fried Bombay Duck
85. Prawn Vindaloo
86. Prawns in Coconut Gravy
87. Prawns and Brinjal Curry
88. Prawn Temperado / Tempered Prawns
89. Spicy Fried prawns in Batter
90. Prawn Pepper Fry
91. Fried Prawns in Batter
92.Spicy Crab Curry
93. Dry Pepper Crab Fry
94.Egg and tomato Curry
95. Egg Vindaloo
96. Egg Temperado / Tempered Eggs
97. Poached Eggs and Tomato Stir fry
98. Pickled Eggs
99. Bengal Lancers Egg Curry
100. Major Gray’s Minty Egg Curry

III. VEGETARIAN VARIETY

1. Simple Mixed Vegetable Curry
2. Green Peas and Potato Curry
3. Cauliflower and Potato in Coconut Gravy
4. Brinjal / Eggplant Vindaloo
5. Tangy Lady’s Finger / Okra
6. Capsicum, Eggplant and Potato Curry
7. Pumpkin and Tomato Curry
8. Drumstick and Potato Curry
9. Mixed Vegetable Stew
10. Mixed Vegetable Ball (Kofta) Curry
11. Vegetable Jalfrazie
12. Tangy Baby Onions Curry
13. Dhal and Vegetable Curry (Split Lentils and dhal)
14. Red Lentils (Masur Dhal) and Tomato Curry
15. Split Lentils (Tur Dhal) and Spinach Curry
16. Anglo-Indian Dhal Mash
17. Capsicum stuffed with Potatoes
18. Vegetarian Masala Chops
19. Potato Chops
20. Potato Croquettes
21. Railway Vegetable Cutlets
22. Potato Patties
23. Cabbage Foogath (Cabbage Stir fry Side Dish)
24. Greens Foogath
25. Beans Foogath
26. Stir fry Cauliflower
27. Cauliflower and Spring Onions Stir fry
28. Lady’s Finger (Okra) and Tomato
29. Fried Lady’s Finger (Okra)
30. Yam Fry

IV. ANGLO-INDIAN RICE DELICACIES

1. Steamed Rice or Plain White Rice
2. Anglo-Indian Yellow Coconut Riace
3. Pish Pash Rice or Smashed Rice
4. Plain Pulao
5. An Easy Mutton / Lamb Pulao
6. Junglee Chicken Pulao
7. Prawn Pulao
8. Fish Pulao
9. Fish and Boiled Eggs Kedgeree
10. Egg Pulao
11. Vegetable Pulao
12. Tomato and Coriander Leaves Pulao

V PICKLES AND CHUTNEYS

1 Brinjal / Egg Plant / Aubergine Piackle
2. Mango Pickle (Sweet)
3. Lime Pickle (Sweet)
4. Goose Berry Pickle
5. Chicken Pickle
6. Fish Padda
7. Salt Fish Pickle
8. Prawn Pickle
9. Pork Pickle
10. Meat Pickle
11. Sweet Mango Chutney Preserve
12. Devil Chutney (Hell’s flame chutney)
13. Palau Chutney or Curd Chutney
14. Tomato Chutney
15. Mint Chutney

VI. SAVOURIES, SWEETS AND FESTIVE TREATS

1. Hot Mince Curry Puffs
2 Sweet Coconut Puffs
3. Savoury Potato Fritters
4. Savoury Fried Dumplings (Pakoras)
5. Dog’s Bone (Savoury Doughnuts)
6. Fish Fingers
7. Batter Fried Prawns
8. Chicken Fritters
9. Vegetable Croquettes
10. Pepper Cheese Balls
11. Chillie Cheese Sticks
12. Sweet Plantain / Banana Fritters
13. Dumplings in Milk
14. Semolina Sweet Dish or Kesari Bath
15. Vermicelli Sweet Dish
16. Doughnuts
17. Short Bread Biscuits
18. Rice and Coconut Gruel (Good Friday Rice Congee)
19. Old Fashioned Bread Pudding
20. Cashew Nut Macaroons
21. Coconut Macaroons
22. Kul Kuls / Kal Kals (A Christmas Sweet)
23. Rose Cookies / Rosa Cookies
24. Guava Cheese
25. Coconut Sweets
26. Dol Dol (Black Rice Flour and Coconut Halwa)
27. Marshmallows
28. Marzipan Sweets
29. Groundnut Toffee
30. Cashew Nut Fudge
31. Milk Toffee
32. Matrimony Sweet ( Semolina and Coconut Sweet)
33. Traditional Christmas Cake
34. Rich Plum Cake with Almond Icing
35. A Simple Christmas Fruit Cake
36. Chocolate Yule Log Cake
37. Butter Sponge Cake
38. Dark Chocolate Cake
39. Bole Cake
40. Christmas Plum Pudding

VII HOME MADE WINES
1 Grape Wine
2 Ginger Wine
3 Beetroot Wine
4 Gooseberry Wine
5 Apple Wine

VIII SOME BASIC CURRY POWDERS

1 Chillie Powder
2 All purpose Anglo-Indian Curry Powder
3 Pepper Water Powder
4 Vindaloo Curry Powder / Paste
5 All Spice Powder (Garam Masala)

1 A List of Common Ingredients and Spices used in Anglo-Indian Cooking
2. Glossary
3. Weights and Measures
4. Anglo-Indian Recipe Books by Bridget White
5. About the Author – Bridget White-Kumar

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